Friday, August 2, 2013

8/2/13 Fun Facts of the Day

Today is a special edition of Fun Facts; it will be focused on the curiosities surrounding music, and not the giant bust that is Wii Music. What I mean is that I will examine music across an array of video games and find their secrets. So, let's dig in.

Topping off our list, it is notable that the Sonic series has had its fair share of music fun-stuffs if you know what I mean (which you probably don't, because I don't know what it means either). For example, the main composer of Sonic Rush, Hideki Naganuma drew inspiration from other music pieces. This can be seen due to the striking similarity with  the piece back 2 Back (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zffEhNq-BR4) and Louie Louie by Richard Berry (most obviously seen when Back 2 Back is played at the one minute mark). Another more unusual example is that the music piece, Wrapped in Black (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppqoqbbz1xM), oddly enoigh, uses audio from a speech by Malcolm X, a famous African-American human rights activist.

In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Peach's Final Smash move plays a rather peculiar track. When slowed down drastically, it is revealed to be the Coin Heaven theme from Super Mario Bros. 3, aka the proclaimed "greatest Mario game of all time". (Pfffffft. Greatest? What a bunch of bologna.)

While not related to music, this fact is pertaining to sound. In Super Mario 64, if you take Bowser's laugh and speed it up, it actually makes the sound of a Boo. Hence, the Boo's voice is just Bowser's sped up.

The underwater theme from Super Mario Bros. 3 bares a striking resemblance to the fairy theme from Ocarina of Time.  Their similarity can be seen in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrlkV06mxXI

Oddly enough, a music piece called Rydeen by the Yellow Magic Orchestra can be found in four games from the 1980s: Super Locomotive ('82), Trooper Truck ('83), Ocean Loader ('84), and Stryker's Run ('86). The music can be heard here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk6o4GWFIV8#at=33. Groovy.

Lastly, one of the most troll-lol-lol-lol-ish urban legends in Pokemon: Lavender Town Syndrome. Supposedly, the original soundtrack caused young children to commit suicide and all sorts of other nonsensical crap. There are even Youtube videos alluding to it; one such video says that by adding extra soundwaves, the soundwaves create an image of Haunter and the Unown spelling for "Go Away". Whatever.

DISCLAIMER: Lavender town syndrome does not exist and has never existed. No such events have happened causing deaths of children based on a video game. However, Katamari games are known to give the Ordinary Gamer effects of strong headaches and nausea.

That's about it. See ya later!

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